Category Archives: Health

Becoming A Dermatologist

HOW TO SELECT A DERMATOLOGIST

Tips when seeking care

Before making an appointment with a dermatologist, it is important to consider their level of training. Board-certified dermatologists have at least eight years of medical training, if not more. They have proven their expertise by passing difficult board exams and meeting other requirements

Board-certified: It is important to check whether your dermatologist is board-certified. If they are, the initials FAAD will appear after their name. FAAD stands for “Fellow of the American Academy of Dermatology.” A dermatologist’s website is often a good place to check. It will either list FAAD after their name or discuss their board certification.

Insurance: If you are uncertain about insurance coverage, call your insurance provider. They are the best source for learning whether a dermatologist is in your network and if the visit is covered. They can also tell you whether treatment for a particular condition is covered. Note that strictly cosmetic procedures — such as treatment for wrinkles — usually are not covered.

Booking the appointment: As is true for many specialists, there can be a wait to see a dermatologist. To help you get timely care, dermatologists offer the follow tips.

Make your appointment early. The earlier you can book your appointment, the better. If you are scheduling a routine appointment, call several weeks or even months ahead of when you wish to be seen

How to Choose a Dermatologist

Know the types. A general dermatologist will treat rashes, acne, and rosacea; they do skin exams to check for questionable moles; and they can help with issues such as thinning hair. They are a good starting place for anti-aging prescriptions such as Retin-A or hydroquinone for wrinkles and brown spots. Deeply etched wrinkles, scars, or persistent discoloration—anything that requires a peel, injection, or laser—are best treated by a cosmetic dermatologist.

Check their bios. Doctors usually have one on their practice’s website. Look for board certification from the American Academy of Dermatology—you don’t want to get Botox from someone certified as an OB-GYN. A website is also a good place to see whether the doctor’s focus is general or cosmetic and if she specializes further. Someone who names laser treatments, or Botox and fillers, will be more experienced than a doctor who insists she does them all equally well.

Go for a consult. Schedule your first appointment for a Monday or Tuesday. These are usually the busiest days. Take advantage of the full waiting room and ask your fellow patients about their experiences. It’s a good sign if you have to wait several weeks for a consultation; the doctor is in demand. Most doctors charge for a consultation, but often that fee is put toward the cost of a procedure

Listen up. When you meet a cosmetic dermatologist for the first time, I think it’s best to give a vague sense of why you’re there and then let her talk. Mention that you’re bothered by the lines on your face or noticeable leg veins, but don’t go into all the remedies you’ve researched online. Listen to how she’d address those issues. Her opinion will give you a sense of her aesthetic philosophy, including how aggressive she is.

Ask the right questions. You want someone who does the procedures you’re seeking all the time. At least three to five cases a day is good; more is even better. For lasers, ask if the practice owns or rents the devices. If they rent, they aren’t lasering as much. Also be sure to ask who is doing the lasering. Some doctors will say they “supervise” the treatment a nurse or technician performs, but I don’t think that’s enough. The doctor should be hands-on

Signs of a Great Dermatologist

Not all dermatologists are created equal. Finding the one who will work with you to resolve your particular problems and concerns requires some research. When you’re looking for your ideal dermatologist

The best credentials. Report cards matter. Any doctor with a medical degree can start a dermatology practice, but certified physicians boast additional years of supervised study and have passed rigorous exams. Do a free online search to ensure that a prospective dermatologist is board certified by the American Board of Dermatology, which is the gold standard for the industry, says Wendy Lewis, the author of America’s Cosmetic Doctors and a cosmetic surgery consultant. She warns, “Many doctors call themselves dermatologists but may be internists, general practitioners, or something else.”

Unrushed appointments. Exceptional dermatologists don’t look at the clock; they look at your chart and are completely focused on your personal story and your questions. “Your dermatologist should take the time to explain things, address your concerns, and explain treatment plans, as well as any tests you may have to undergo,” says David Bank, MD, president of the New York State Society for Dermatology and Dermatologic Surgery. If a dermatologist dismisses your thoughts, is difficult to follow up with, or rushes you through an appointment, it’s time to find someone who values you more as a patient

No sales pitching. It’s a doctor’s office — not a home shopping television show. The dermatologist and the office staff should never aggressively push products, treatments, or other remedies that don’t specifically address your personal concerns. “If you feel that a dermatologist is selling you, he or she may be more interested in your money than in helping you,” says Dr. Bank

A generous sampling policy. An office chock-full of mini tubes of various products shows that a dermatologist genuinely wants patients to find the best — and not just any — solution to a given skin problem, and that he or she is conscious of budgets and prescription copay amounts. “If your dermatologist wants you to try a product to make sure it’s right for you before you commit to buying a prescription, it’s a great sign,” says Bank. And don’t be shy; speak up and ask if samples are available, as doctors often have to trash loads of expired samples.

TIPS: WHAT TO LOOK FOR IN A DERMATOLOGIST

Dermatologists diagnose and treat more than 3,000 different diseases and conditions related to the skin, hair, nails, and mucous membranes (the lining inside the eyelids, nose, and mouth).  A dermatologist is specially qualified to treat a variety of conditions including acne, eczema, psoriasis, rashes, rosacea, skin cancer, wrinkles, age spots, and hair loss. People of all ages, from newborns to those over 100 years of age, can often benefit from regularly seeing a skilled dermatologist.

In order to become a dermatologist, candidates must complete a minimum of 12 years of post-secondary education, including a minimum of 3 years in a dermatology residency program. This equates to a requirement of 12,000 to 16,000 patient hours.

Unfortunately, not all dermatologists are created equal. Finding the right dermatologist for your needs requires time and effort. It’s always a good idea to research any prospective physician online and/or solicit referrals from friends and family

BOARD CERTIFIED

Choose a dermatologist that is board certified by the American Board of Dermatology. While technically any doctor with a medical degree can start a skin care practice

CONSIDER THE NEED FOR SPECIALIZATION

Some board certified dermatologists complete additional education and training in order to specialize in areas like Mohs surgery, dermatopathology, or pediatric dermatology. Such additional fellowship training can be extremely valuable when it comes to properly treating certain conditions. Patients who know they need a specific procedure should concentrate their search on dermatologists with additional fellowship training. Ask any candidate about their history performing the procedure including complications.

HOW TO CHOOSE A DERMATOLOGIST?

Look at their credentials – check to see if they’re board certified. Do you prefer a medical doctor or a doctor of osteopathy? Some patients prefer one over the other. This is your personal choice and preference.

Attitude. How does the doctor answer and address your needs? A good doctor will listen to your questions and do his or her best to answer. Providing you with information you understand and not just medical terms. Convenience. If you really enjoy a doctor’s office but find that it is too far out of your way. See if they’re willing to work around your schedule. That way you can drive after work or on a weekend.

Get faster results from treatment. Acne treatment takes time regardless of whether you’re treating mild or severe acne. That said, it does take less time and effort to clear a few pimples than a breakout that could include blackheads, whiteheads, and deep-seated acne cysts

Reduce scars. Treating acne early may prevent acne scars. In general, the more severe the acne, the more likely it is to scar.

Stop lingering spots from developing when acne clears. Anyone who has medium-to-dark colored skin may see a dark spot appear when an acne pimple, cyst, or nodule clears. Dermatologists call this post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation (PIH). People with light-colored skin may see a red spot where acne once was. These spots can linger for months. Many consider it worse to have these lingering spots than the acne itself.

Use Dentist Ratings Websites To Find A Top Rated Dentist

Why It’s Important to Choose the Right Dentist

Your dentist is a health care provider, similar to your personal physician. As you know the importance of choosing the right doctor, the same is true for your dentist.

You may be surprised to learn how many adults do not visit the dentist unless they have an emergency. In many cases, it is not because they cannot afford it, or cannot fit appointments into their schedules. Many people avoid the dentist because of bad experiences they had when they were young.

What If You Need Dental Treatment?

Under ideal circumstances, your experiences with dentistry will include twice-annual exams and cleanings. You will have a dental professional to answer your questions. However, choosing a dentist is also important when you need any type of dental treatment or dental work.

You want a dentist who is fully qualified to treat your particular dental issue. Whether you need implants, a filling for a cavity, or root canal therapy, a dentist’s training and experience will make a difference. Your treatment can be completed without complications, and the least amount of difficulty for you.

You can look at choosing a dentist the same as choosing a personal physician. When you are looking for a dentist who will meet your needs today and in the future, make an appointment to meet the dentist in person. When you see his overall attitude and professionalism helps you feel comfortable and confident, your oral health care will always be a positive experience.

Finding a Dentist

When you’re searching for a dentist, the American Dental Association (ADA) offers these suggestions:

Ask family, friends, neighbors, or co-workers for their recommendations.

Ask your family doctor or local pharmacist.

If you’re moving, ask your current dentist to make a recommendation.

Contact your local or state dental society. The ADA provides a list of local and state dental societies on its web site, www.ada.org. Your local and state dental societies also may be listed in the telephone directory under “dentists” or “associations.”

What Should I Look For When Choosing a Dentist?

You and your dentist will be long-term oral health care partners; therefore, you should find someone you can be comfortable with. To find a suitable dentist to meet your needs,

consider asking the following questions as a starting point:

What are the office hours? Are they convenient for your schedule?

Is the office easy to get to from work or home?

Where was the dentist educated and trained?

What’s the dentist’s approach to preventive dentistry?

How often does the dentist attend conferences and continuing education workshops?

What type of anesthesia is the dentist certified to administer to help you relax and feel more comfortable during any necessary dental treatment?

What arrangements are made for handling emergencies outside of office hours? (Most dentists make arrangements with a colleague or emergency referral service if they are unable to tend to emergencies.)

Is information provided about all fees and payment plans before treatment is scheduled? If you are comparison shopping, ask for estimates on some common procedures such as full-mouth X-rays, an oral exam and cleaning, and filling a cavity.

Does the dentist participate in your dental health plan?

What is the dentist’s office policy on missed appointments?

How to Find a Good Dentist

KAREN VASSO, A 43-YEAR old farmer from Chelmsford, Massachusetts, takes good care of her health. In addition to the copious amounts of physical exercise she gets while working, she’s an avid swimmer and triathlete, who’s completed a few solo 12.5-mile swims around Key West in Florida. She also has a background in nutrition and knows that good dental health is an important aspect of overall wellness. She’s long sought to make visiting a dentist regularly a priority. However, a couple of bad experiences over the years have caused her to think carefully about what makes a good dentist and how to find the right one for her

The first incident occurred several years ago. At the time, Vasso was a single mother and her health insurance wasn’t terribly robust, so her options of which dentist she could see were limited. “I went to this quiet, dark office in the basement of a building” in a nearby town. The office was mostly empty, save for the dentist himself, and Vasso recalls thinking, “this is scary.” Undeterred by her gut intuition, she went through with the appointment. “He cleaned my teeth and at the end he said, ‘you have a cavity. I’m going to need you to come back for a filling.’ I know my teeth. I have extensive knowledge about nutrition and how that affects dental health,” and she says she suspected she didn’t actually have a cavity

Fast forward a few years to a new town and new health insurance, and Vasso decided it was time to do something about the lack of routine dental care she’d had for the past couple of years and scheduled an appointment with a local dentist. She opted for “a very big chain dental practice” that was in her insurance plan and made an appointment for a cleaning. “They did a cleaning and a cursory exam and told me I had six cavities. It blew my mind – there’s no way I have six cavities,” she says, feeling outraged.

Before she was even able to get clarification on where and how severe these cavities were, she’d been herded to the front desk to settle her bill and make several more appointments for additional dental work. Vasso decided she didn’t trust that dentist and made an appointment elsewhere for a second opinion. As suspected, that subsequent dentist confirmed she had no cavities at all, let alone six of them. “Can you imagine them drilling into my teeth for no reason? It blows my mind,” she says.

When looking for a dentist, Cooper says you should seek one that practices close to your home or work and that has convenient hours. It’s also important to consider any unique communication issues you might have. For example, “if English isn’t your first language, do you need a translator? In my practice, I have a lot pf patients who are Japanese,” she says, and although these patients “speak English perfectly well out in the world,” when it comes to the specific or technical vocabulary of health care, having a translator to convey this information in a patient’s native language can facilitate better understanding. “Sometimes having a translator there who can offer assurance about what’s going on in your own language can be extremely important,” she says. Arranging with the dentist ahead of time to have a translator available or bringing a friend or family member who’s able to act as translator are both strategies you can employ to make sure you don’t miss anything.

How to Find a Good Dentist: The Ultimate Guide

Moving to a new area? Not happy with your current provider but you need to schedule a dentist today? Don’t settle for the first dentist you come across. You’re putting your finances and your health on the line. The only problem is that it’s easy to get lost when you see a myriad of dentists readily available to you.

How to Find a Good Dentist: Start with the Basics

Learning how to pick a dentist starts by checking the ones closest to you. Choose one that’s near your home or your office, making it easy to visit if you use public transportation. Think of how you can get to it in case of emergency as well.

What Type of Dentist Do You Need?

Next, you also have to consider the type of dentist you want. Although a general dentist might refer to themselves as a cosmetic or family dentist, these are not official specialisations.

Ask for Recommendations from Friends and Family

Chances are, friends and family will happily suggest a good dentist that they are comfortable and satisfied with. Ask them specifics of what they like about their dentists to give you a better idea of their work.

Look for a Member of an Organisation

If you are relocating to a new city, your current dentist may have a recommendation too. Dentists working within an association could know someone in the city you’re moving to.

Things to Look For When Choosing a New Dentist

Find a dentist with a good reputation

The first important consideration when looking for the perfect dentist is to check his or her reputation. There are several ways to research dentists and their practice history. One of the first things to do is to search online reviews to see what positive or negative experiences patients have had at their dentist. Websites, such as Angie’s List, offer reviews from patients on dentists

Check your state dental board

Dentists are held accountable by their state dental board. Each state has a board of dentistry website that tracks the history of claims against a particular dentist. Make sure that the dentist you are about to see does not have any suspicious claims brought against them.

Interview your dentist

You need to interview your dentist or the dental practice, which is a simple as picking up the phone and asking the right questions. Find out where the dentist graduated, how long they have been practicing and what type of dentistry they do, how many staff members work there and how long have they been with that dentist.

Ask friends and family about their dentist

Ask your friends and neighbors where they go for dental work. There is no better way to find a great dentist than to find out who your friends and neighbors trust. Most people will not recommend bad service to you or advise you to see a dentist they are not pleased with.

Make sure your dentist meets your needs

Everyone has a certain criteria when they look for the right dental office. Some patients want a larger practice that sees a high volume of patients. Their time is valuable and they want to get in and get out. Others may seek a family-oriented practice that treats each patient as a part of their family. They want a doctor who will spend the time explaining things to them and not rush the appointment. Make the decision that is right for you.